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The Legend of Zelda:
Zelda Wii U
Walkthrough
Overview

by Hylian Dan

In this five-part article series for The Missing Link, renowned Zelda theorist Hylian Dan discusses The Wind Waker‘s deepest themes and philosophical connections. Read the entire article below.

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. PART ONE: Leaving Paradise
    1. Introduction
    2. The Islander and the Sailor
    3. The Longing of the Heart
    4. Immovable Objects
    5. Escaping the Cage
  3. PART TWO: Growing Wings
  4. PART THREE: Chasing Dreams
  5. PART FOUR: Planting Seeds
  6. PART FIVE: Becoming the Champion of Life

“If only I could do things over again…”

The King of Hyrule speaks these words at the end of The Wind Waker. As he faces his own ending, the king reflects on how he has lived his life. Looking back, the king perceives only yearning and regret. Looking back, he perceives his own foolishness.

“Time certainly laughs at us all, huh?”

A traveling merchant says this to Link on an island in the Great Sea. The merchant explains that he has a dream of one day opening his own shop. He set out to pursue this dream long ago, but things did not quite work out. The days went by and plans got delayed, and now thirty years have passed fruitlessly.

Time is passing and the merchant lets it slip through his fingers. Life has passed and for too long the King of Hyrule has not lived it.

But in all this time, the king has at least learned something: that there is a better way to go through life. As the king prepares to face his death, he speaks to Link and Tetra and tells them, “I have lived regretting the past.”

“But you…

I want you to live for the future.”

These words are the thesis of The Wind Waker. The entire game is built around this philosophy: live for the future. The game is laced with metaphors and parables that develop this theme and support it with examples. The metaphors—islands and oceans, birds and cages, winds and sails, trees and seeds—illustrate this philosophy while the parables—the storylines that unfold throughout the game—provide context for these metaphors, showing how they may be applied to the way we live our lives.

Time slips away all too easily. There are many people who grow old too quickly, who look back and sadly speak the words, “If only…” But there are other ways of living, ways that lead to happier destinations. There are lessons to be learned from Link’s adventure on the Great Sea, for The Wind Waker is a guide to living a fulfilling life.

Introduction

‘Tis a peaceful place, this here island…

The people here would never even dream of leavin’ their little paradise and settin’ sail on a voyage at sea, know what I mean?

Why, this town is full of faces that don’t even show the slightest interest in the sails of a ship. Are we sailors the only ones?
Has no one else set out on the Great Sea?

—Kane, the Sailor

One of the most memorable features of The Wind Waker is the design of the game world: small islands and vast oceans. This design does more than simply set up the gameplay and story, however. It conveys a certain way of seeing the world. Sometimes we have solid ground beneath our feet. At other times we are on our own, and nothing but our own resilience is there to keep us afloat.

We live in relation to islands and oceans. This is one of the key philosophical points of The Wind Waker. Islands represent comfort while oceans represent hardship. Many of the people who populate the Great Sea spend all their years within the confines of a single island, clinging to a personal little paradise. To them, the sea is too vast and dangerous and it is better and easier to remain at home.

It is true that those who sail the seas face many dangers. But, there is also a danger that threatens those who never set out on the Great Sea: the prospect of an unlived life.

The Islander and the Sailor

What? You worried about little old me, fry?

Hah! Don’t be! I’m a man-fish! I’ve spent my life being toughened up by seas rougher than any you’ve ever seen!
—The Fishman

The Wind Waker begins by introducing two of its central characters, one who embodies the lifestyle of an islander and another who embodies the lifestyle of a sailor.

Link, the islander

Link has spent his entire life thus far on Outset Island, a place of comfort and beauty. His is a life of leisure, with plenty of time for napping. He has a cherished sister, a loving grandmother, and a whole community of friends there to support him.

And then there is Tetra. She seems to be of a similar age to Link but she has already managed to become the leader of a band of pirates. One of her companions explains the circumstances of her life that led to this:

You’re probably wondering why we treat young Miss Tetra with so much respect when she’s clearly so much younger than us, aren’t you, now?

I suppose it was just chance that we lost our last Miss when Miss Tetra was still young. Hooo… Fate is cruel, she is.
That’s why Miss Tetra took over so young. She owes it to her predecessor.

Everyone’s come to respect her for that. For coping with so much, at such an age. Respect has nothing to do with how many years you’ve been on the earth.
—Nudge, the Pirate

There was no life of leisure for Tetra. The mother who should have been there to love and support Tetra vanished from the world. But Tetra endured.

When Tetra meets Link, one of the first things she observes is how this boy handles loss: when Link’s sister is kidnapped, Link is horrified and he abandons his senses. Chasing after the great bird that has Aryll, Link runs straight off a cliff.

Uhhn! Stupid kid!

Get ahold of yourself! She’s gone. There’s nothing you can do.
—Tetra

Tetra the sailor already understands hardship and loss, but Link the islander is inexperienced and reckless.

Tetra is familiar with hardship, but Link is inexperienced and reckless.

As Link recovers some of his wits, he sets a goal for himself: to rescue his sister, no matter what. The local adults warn Link, “Setting out like this means many long hours of toil and hardship lie ahead of you.” But Link goes forth to pursue this goal, even though it means leaving behind his life of leisure.

Still, Tetra challenges Link. As the boy gazes back at his island and the crowd of loved ones cheering for him, Tetra smirks. “I can tell you’re just going to get more sentimental from here on out. There’s still time, you know… Are you sure we shouldn’t just turn around and take you back to your island?”

But Link proceeds, and his life as an islander ends. He lets go of paradise and prepares to face the world beyond. This is one of the necessary stages of life, for paradise does not last forever. Living for the future means being willing to let go.

The Longing of the Heart

Not all of The Wind Waker’s characters are as bold as Link. There are many people who do not take such a step. Instead, they live bound to the life that they have always known.

One such person is Missy, an old lady who is a permanent resident of Windfall Island. She spends her days gazing at Dragon Roost Island on the horizon. She’s heard stories of the majestic Rito Tribe that lives there, and she longs to see the place with her own eyes.

The sky-dancing Rito tribe… A mystical sky spirit… Dragon Roost Island just sounds like a paradise floating in the ocean of my dreams!

But… to someone like me, a person who’s never left this little island, it may as well be a fairy tale out of a child’s book. …Oh, if only I had my own boat!
—Missy

Missy is confined to Windfall Island.

Missy has a dream but she does not pursue it, not believing she is able to. As Missy grows old, she thinks of this dream and speaks those words, “If only…” Time is slipping away, but she is confined to her island.

In this way, The Wind Waker presents the metaphor of islands and oceans in literal terms: some people stay on islands and others set sail. However, this metaphor extends beyond such literal expression.

Lenzo, Windfall Island’s famed pictographer, tells Link a story of two people who also live the lifestyle Missy represents. He is speaking of the young adults Anton and Linda:

Somewhere in town is a couple, a man and woman whose hearts are secretly filled with thoughts of the other, and yet for reasons unknown, the two have never spoken.

Even when they happen, by chance, to pass each other in the road, they each steal a brief, furtive glance of the other, but they suppress the longing in their hearts…

I cannot let this tragedy go on any longer!
—Lenzo

They suppress the longing in their hearts; Lenzo dramatically calls this act a tragedy. Time marches forward as Anton and Linda stand in place, bound to their comfort zones.

Anton and Linda gaze at each other, and then walk away.

Fortunately, Lenzo intervenes and pulls some strings, with Link’s help. Anton finally decides to ask Linda out on a date.

…So what’s her name, anyway? Do you think she’s nice? Does she have a steady fellow? Ohhhhh, I’m so NERVOUS!
—Anton

Such is the feeling of taking a chance. But in spite of the fear, Anton speaks with Linda and things go well for him.

Hey! It’s you! Listen to this, will you?

I…DID…IT! I worked up my courage, and I talked to her, and it was totally the right move! You know why, buddy? She likes me!

She actually likes me!

Everything’s coming up roses for me…

Life IS good, buddy!
—Anton

Lenzo is able to perceive that there is a better life waiting for Anton and Linda, if they can just muster the nerve to pursue it.

Immovable Objects

Nevertheless, there are others who do not feel any need to step past their limited comfort areas. They are happy with life the way it is, and they do not want it to change.

Minenco was dubbed Miss Windfall forty years ago, and she relishes that status every day. She refuses to believe that her physical beauty will ever fade.

My skin will always be beautiful! Hoo hoo hoo! Not even the younger girls look prettier than me!
—Minenco

There is also Manny, a fan boy who is content to wander the Nintendo Gallery in awe. The Nintendo Gallery is a series of rooms that Link and a sculptor named Carlov gradually fill with figurines.

Listen… Please try not to interrupt me as I gaze upon my figurines…in supreme bliss. All I want out of life is just the chance to hang out and gaze at my figurines… My life is soooo good.
—Manny

The allegorical content here is thinly veiled. Manny is happy to live life in a bubble, a world of hand-made figurines in place of real people. It is a world not unlike the Zelda universe: an artificial escape from reality. Manny wants to stay in this paradise forever.

However, there are consequences to living such a blissful, unchanging lifestyle. The Wind Waker uses several characters to illustrate these consequences.

The Little Tipsters

On Windfall, there are two girls who have earned the nickname “The Little Tipsters” thanks to their habit of spreading rumors about the island. There happen to be two middle-aged women, Pompie and Vera, who are also eagerly exchanging idle gossip. When Link eavesdrops on their conversation, they become upset.

…She is so saucy, isn’t she!

I can’t believe she’s a schoolteacher!

Hm? …Now, just WHAT are you doing?

Were you listening to us, you scamp?

We’re discussing…very, VERY important topics that kids just wouldn’t understand. You’re far too young to be listening to us, young man! So shoo!
—Pompie and Vera

Pompie and Vera

Pompie and Vera fuss about the fact that Link is a child, but their own lack of maturity is quite apparent. They come across as older counterparts of the Little Tipsters, alike in both appearance and behavior. Pompie and Vera have simply spent a longer amount of time doing what the Little Tipsters are doing.

That is what becomes of people who live unchanging lives. They grow old, but they do not grow.

The Wind Waker takes this important point even further. On the Private Oasis, a nasty butler guards the cabana of Miss Marie the schoolteacher. The butler serves two purposes: he scowls and barks at any stranger who comes close, and he welcomes the owner of the cabana whenever he or she visits. When the master or mistress is present, the butler’s demeanor changes abruptly and he becomes as polite and subservient as is humanly possible. But there is a catch: the butler is not quite human.

Ah! All of a sudden, I have become painfully aware of my existence as a door.

Wah! Waaaaaah!
—The Butler

The butler plays the role of a door.

The butler’s two purposes are that of a door: to chase people away and to welcome them. The butler has spent so much of his life simply playing this role that the game depicts him in the physical form of a door.

This is the danger that paradise poses. One who remains on an island for too long risks becoming as immovable as the island itself. The energy of life drains away with time, leaving only an inanimate object.

Escaping the Cage

Link is thrown into a prison cell.

As Link storms the Forsaken Fortress early in The Wind Waker, he gets thrown into a prison cell if the guards spot him. Tetra rebukes Link if he spends too much time lounging around in the cage.

Are you planning on spending the rest of your life in there?!

Look around! I’d be surprised if a run-down cell like that didn’t have a hole or two that you could use to worm your way out!
—Tetra

Surely enough there is a crack in the wall hidden behind a vase. Link wriggles through the crevice and escapes to freedom.

Tetra’s question, “Are you planning on spending the rest of your life in there?!” connects Link’s behavior to the behavior of the permanent islanders. Islands are small, confined places – and so is Link’s prison cell.

Islands tempt people with their beauty, with their safe familiarity, with the easy life that they promise.

But beneath the illusion of paradise, there is a cage.

Missy the elderly lady is a prisoner of Windfall Island. She is unable to perceive any crack in the wall leading to freedom. As the years of her life slip away, she gazes past the bars of her cage and says, “If only…”

Paradises are places of beauty, but those who live in paradise must be able to let go of it lest it become a prison cell. It is a shame to spend all one’s time in a small, confined space when there is a great wide world out there, waiting to be experienced.

A world of islands and oceans

Ahh, do you not feel the grand romance of the wide open skies? The roaring invitation of the wind? The soft call of the clouds?

You are a boring, boring creature.
—Willi, the Bird-Man

Whenever Link sets out for the Great Sea, the island he had just visited shrinks into a tiny speck behind him. The Legend of Zelda theme song begins playing as the wide ocean stretches out in every direction. The little paradises fade away as new shadows appear on the horizon, gradually taking shape as Link sails towards them.

A life of adventure awaits those with the courage to step beyond their comfort zones.

About the Author

Dan Merrill, aka Hylian Dan, attends Champlain College in Burlington, Vermont, where he is majoring in electronic game design. His portfolio can be found at www.danvmerrill.com.

E-mail: hyliandan [at] zeldauniverse.net

Next part – Growing Wings

  • Kiante

    Very nice article! Thought out, organized, relevant, a great read. I wish I could say more, but you've said it all already.

    • Waker of Winds

      You're majoring in game design but I think you can pass of as a major in literature and composition!

  • John

    Great article! I'm going through kind of a difficult time in my life, I will have to move to another town, start going to college, begin my own life, and this article made me think about the whole thing with optimism. Time to leave this here island and sail away. Thanks!

    • Gerudude

      Each of us have gone or will go through this fase.
      Actually it is just one big adventure.

  • MakarthekorokWarrior

    Amazing! There really is so much philosophy hidden deep within Zelda, and every time I read an article like this, I am amazed to find more. Additionally, Wind Waker is my favorite game, and one that is surprisingly both overlooked by gamers and even by Zelda fans. Personally, Ocarina of Time is not even on my list of top five Zelda's, although it is undeniably one of the best games ever made. And yet Wind Waker was very different. It was the end of one era and the dawn of another. And no other game has ever really given me that same feeling. No other game like it has been made. I mean if you think about it, AOL was made based off of LOZ. LA, although a very original game, was still heavily built off of ALTTP. MM was for the same system and had similar graphics and mechanics to OOT. ST developed from PH. Zelda Wii from TP. But really, there is nothing like WW. It was the end of Hyrule, Gandondorf (he's dead, not tossed into a cursed realm) the master sword, everything, and it left Link and Zelda in the middle of the ocean to find their own, new land. PH was just a deviation from that journey, so similar to the Hero of Time's days spent in Termina, an adventure so short in reality, that it never really happened and yet so long in its own way. 10 minutes? 3 days? A whole new world saved. A deviation from the hero's journey. And after both of these adventures, the adventures that some could say are required to birth a true hero, adventures lost in another land, a deviation from your journey, a quest into a foreign land just to save a friend…Nintendo leaves us, with Link still lost in the forest…still lost in the ocean. What happens next? It is almost like Link himself was caught up and truly experienced that lonliness of immobileness, trapped on an island. ST saves Link, the Hero of Winds, it shows us that Link didn't fall into the motions, didn't get lost in paradise, he finished his goal and established a land that is Hyrule and yet is nothing like it, and for that he is my favorite Link.

    Sorry…although said in a very roundabout, confusing way, this article envokes, in a much less confusing way, all of the symbolism found in the islands and oceans, in the people, in the very fiber of, The Wind Waker.

    • http://intensedebate.com/people/lifesavers2 lifesavers2

      In WW hes not really dead, hes sealed in stone by the Master Sword, Much like in the sacred realm sealed by the master sword.

  • KeeSomething

    This is not only a great article about Wind Waker, but a great article on how to live life.

  • tetra

    Awesome! I thought it was truly amazing and full of insight, too. You definitely brought the figurative theme of link's everlasting and ongoing courage to fulfill the matters of Hyrulian life in the Wind Waker. Good job

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  • http://intensedebate.com/profiles/stuff2o STUFF2o

    Shiggy and Aonuma should write epic poems when they retire. Seriously, it's like someone made a video game from something by Homer, and we only noticed it now.

    We need to look into these things more, I always thought they were just typing up random messages to give something for the NPC's to say. Very good work!

  • Matt

    That is how my so called life feels when it comes to confort zones.I use to as outgoing as the link in Wind Waker.But i have been confined to mom and dad's house for 5 years never really getting back out into the world like i use to and most of my skills like meeting people i could possibly trust has disappeared.

    I can't even tell if i have a crush on a woman my own age.I don't even talk with people much so i am like that kid on Dragon Roost Island who does not talk to anyone until Link finally gets through to him.

  • Hassus

    Great idea for an article. There's a philosophical anime called Kino's Journey, where all that the character does is travel from strange place to strange place and learns new lessons of life from the very special characters, societies and so forth. Many times the characters in Zelda-games have reminded me of this concept. This is something that is easy to forget, but it colours the game experience for me and is a part of why I like Zelda-games.

    One of my favourite examples is the town in total symmetry in Oracle of Ages – that was absolutely crazy and cool, and in my eyes it invited me to think about what it means to want to have control over ones life and why it's simply absurd to obsess over it.

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  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Ezlorocks Ezlo

    Wow… I've never thought of The Wind Waker that way or that deeply. Even the things that most gamers would usually run by and think of it as something to make the game "cuter", it actually does have meaning… and it all relates back to that one topic, or philosophy, as Hylian Dan said. "Living for the future"… I like that.

  • garrador

    amazing read. i love this kind of stuff.

  • Joe

    Your articles are a contant source of inspiration.

    Keep up the good work!

  • http://my-square-eyes.webs.com/ Travis DG Edna

    I'm sorry but I'm not the least convinced. The article may be well written but you simplify to much and you take a thing and make it bigger than it really is. Comparing the scene where Link gets thrown into a prison cell with a life lived in "confinement"? No, life isn't that simple and you're over analysing it.

    I'll give you this: You found a interesting perspective on The Wind Waker but when you're trying to write a full article on the subject, it gets a tad repetitive and thin. Sure, it works on a high school level but don't show this to any professor anytime soon.

    It's true that the theme of The Wind Waker is the question of whether to live a comfortable life on a paradise island or to seek adventure and learn of the world but your comparisons are too farfetched. Furthermore, you make it sound as if a life lived in comfort is "wrong" or "less fulfilling" and if that's the case, then you need to gather some more life experience. People all have their own fears and loves and no one ever perfects himself/herself. There's always the next goal on the horizon and the way we live our lives are more complex than just a question of pursuing your dream or not. In the end: It's more or less impossible to live a life without confrontation of any sort and that's what defines our lives as human-beings: We all have our own goals, our own obstacles and living your life means making the choice of how you handle it. There is no right or wrong way, just your own way.

    But don't think that I disliked your article totally. It was fairly well written and, as mentioned, your idea is interesting. My only problem with it is that you went a bit to far in your analysis. 6/10

    • Guy Dude

      LOSER
      L-O-S-E-R
      LOSER
      L-O-S-E-R

    • Hylian Dan

      Thanks for the input, Travis. Criticism is fine, especially as I'm making the final adjustments to the remaining parts.

      • http://my-square-eyes.webs.com/ Travis DG Edna

        Hey, I didn't mean to trash you. Sorry if I came on too strong. I still think it's interesting and a good read. Just because I don't agree with it doesn't mean I don't think it's worth reading. Keep it up! :)

      • Hylian Dan

        That's fine. One of the most difficult parts of writing these is judging all the connections I notice and working out which are valid, which don't work, and how to fit the right ones in the scope of the article.

        The prison comparison was a tough call, but I'm sticking with it because the theme of confinement is important, and Tetra's line as well as the setting resonate with the themes of the game.

        This part is intended as a caution against letting life and dreams slip away because of inaction, and there's more I will address about the themes of comfort and hardship. But I have reexamined my language in the parts ahead to be very careful about the points I'm making.

      • Daniel G.

        I realize these comments were made over 18 months ago, but I still felt like adding my two cents anyway. In a nutshell, I like your themes and I agree with your articles almost entirely. You can't please everyone, and just because someone disagrees doesn't make your article less amazing. I think your analysis is outstanding, and I hope you consider additional works in the future. Thanks for a great read!

      • Hylian Dan

        Thanks Dan. Writing this series in the middle of college was brutal and I needed to step away from this work for a while. Now my life is finally under control again and I'm trying to put together a few new, smaller pieces. Mostly just a few more thoughts about Majora's Mask – hopefully they'll add some more momentum to Operation Moonfall if I get them done.

    • Ulises

      the scene in the jail was one of the most perfect examples of how our lifes can become a prison, ARE YOU PLANNING ON SPENDING THE REST OF YOUR LIFE IN THERE?! how can that not be a methapore of living on a state of mental and soul confinement? IT TELLS YOU THE DAMM THING JUST PLAIN STRAIGHT!! we all know that life it's more complicated than that BUT if you remember methapores are supposed to compare (even explain) complicated things in A SIMPLE WAY

      • http://my-square-eyes.webs.com/ Travis DG Edna

        Actually, I thought Hylian Dan made some fair comparisons but that the "Are you planning on spending the rest of your life in there?"-thing was the weakest. To me, Tetra is saying this as an sarcastic remark to make Link move. That's how she talks. Sure, you could argue that it is a metaphor but it is a very long shot. And this is before the player gets a chance to meet the other characters living on Windfall and can draw such conclusions. No, it's simply not good enough.

      • Ulises

        Just for a moment think about it in this way; trought time, some people become more and more aware that the best secrets are always the most vague and hard to find. It's nearly imposible to join some of those dots but every once in a while someone does it, and suddenly, every makes more sense than ever!

        Think about your own house, don't you have to lock-up all the doors at night? why? how is the world outside? are you sure you are not living in a confortable prison? think it really hard… what do you do every day of your live? it is not pretty much the same that you did the day before? are you really free?

        I know it may be the weakest reference to something in the entire game and for that i think it is also one of the most deep and at the same time simple and valuable hidden messages of the wind waker. besides you are supossed to play again a second time where you have the chance to see things that you didn't get the first time, in this game it was intended but it happens i beieve with almost everything (movies, cartoons, comics, books, videogames,etc) if you see, play or read something again it's just normal that you can understand it better than the first time so there is no reason to think that a mesage cannot lie hidden before you can get it in the first round, and yet again remember; the more hidden are the best.

    • Hassus

      I agree with you about that somethings are probably analyzed too much in the article. I'm fairly sure that Nintendo hasn't written the name of some kind of "ism" on their blackboard and then taken it from there. However, firstly the ocean theme gives room for some interesting scenarios and secondly Nintendo has a high quality policy with their in-game dialogues in the Zelda-games(it's a part of what makes it exciting to play the games – all the little stories(with little morals) throughout the open world). The Wind Waker was rich on these smaller stories, maybe to make up for the fact that the ocean took up such a great part of it.

      I read the article as your(Hylian Dan's) own experience from this – in my opinion – masterpiece of a game. Not how you think Nintendo had planned it all out.

  • scottwalker

    WOW! very beautiful, like a poem. I would like to ask what you think of the other end of this spectrum like how linebeck cannot seem to stay away from the sea and what drives his zest for life as you explained it

  • Waker of Winds

    Excellent article. I always noticed a philosopical sense of deepness when playing the Wind Waker but you articulated this sense into words. Congrats! This is the best LoZ fan article I have ever read…

  • dark_rose137

    How have I not noticedthis before? I enjoy the LoZ saga and philosophy, but never have I noticed the symbolisim. I’m not too sure if the game designs thought out each idividual aspect of the game into a lesson, but I could be wrong. Despite the fact, this article gives a good lesson to people who are still learning about the world around them like me. By piecing together a valuable lesson with something I enjoy, the message gets across much better than if some old person was just telling me about their life’s regrets. It makes me see that I can’t stay where I am and I should follow my heart no matter what the risk is. I can’t live my life staring at Dragon Roost island all day, metaphoically speaking of course. Congrats, really; an amazing article that taught me something so amazing, yet so basic.

  • Gwen

    Am I the only person in the world who is annoyed that the kids from Windwaker found a new world and called it Hyrule? When the King made the decision to destroy Hyrule and told them to live in the future and that the new land WOULD NOT BE HYRULE? I thought he made it pretty clear that they were supposed to leave the past behind.

  • Keaton

    Just another nice article from Hylian Dan. =] (yes that's the best you're going to get from someone who's commenting two days after reading it)

  • http://www.youtube.com/ganon23000 A-dub

    Jeez…. It's funny when you realize how something as simple as zelda can display such meaningful themes. I've realized some themes later in the game that relate to stories in the Bible, (Flooded Hyrule=Noah's Ark, Leading the people of Hyrule to freedom from darkness=Moses and the Egyptians) But I'm sure you'll mention those in later editions. I guess that you don't have to really look hard for these lessons, you just have to think about it. I'm definitely reading the next part, but for now, great job!

  • Turnip

    Hah! I love it. Great article.

    I believe that the fanboy in the Nintendo gallery is satire of well, us. Like him we have all fallen in love with a life confined among artificial characters. And hell, they're even the same artificial characters too.

    It's almost as if Nintendo is personally telling us: ''Thank you for appreciating our art, but don't forget to experience the world for yourself as well. Instead of staying here forever, be inspired and find your own adventure.''

    What a great series to grow up with.

  • http://www.youtube.com/emeishan twilightlord

    this is awesome, cant wait for the next one

  • Teengamer

    Quite amazing. See, this is why I couldn't become a TML writer, because the real authors are amazing in skill! Still, it'd be fun to work on ZU. :P

    Good article, WW in some ways has so much more depth than Twilight Princess.
    Waiting for part 2!

  • Terminan

    That was just amazing Dan! I've read all your articles, they are quite interesting. I had heard people hinting that you may be writing one on Wind Waker, and was ecstatic to find out it was true! Simply genius!

  • chi

    I absolutely, absolutely dig it entirely. Keep on writing and I'll keep on reading and reflecting.

  • st3ban

    You know, Im really impressed, I've played probably 3 times the wind waker and never put attention to the dialogues more than its need to… Its really nice to see that within the game it lies a great teaching or at least that you have the inteligence to find out..

    I'll be waiting for the next chapter

    greetings from mexico (and yeah I apologize for my grammar mistakes XD)

  • Nicholas

    That is awesome! You should also mention that you cannot sail past where the map defines the sides of the ocean!

  • Nicholas

    That is awesome! You should also mention that you cannot sail past where the map defines the sides of the ocean! You also mentioned in one of your mailbags that Tingle is "basically a Link wannabe, an adult who’s always wanted to be a superhero (and dresses like one) but never got the chance. He could also represent us, the gamers, since forgetting about reality and pretending to be a fairy man with a green tunic and tights destined to fight evil is basically what we do whenever we sit down to play Zelda."

  • Ponce

    Wow. Very nice article man, loved it. I really had to post something on this, it was a really enjoyable and inspiring read. Keep up the good writing Dan.

  • Runnaway

    Thanks man.
    Reading this is just the inspiration I needed to run away from home.

    • Hylian Dan

      Well I'm glad you found it inspiring but keep in mind that image of the reckless and inexperienced Link running straight off a cliff. The game advocates courage, but it also contains a strong warning about hasty actions.

  • jordan

    that was awesome and inspiring. i think you should major in some kind of philosephey because you understand hidden meanings very well.

  • http://twitter.com/argenisleon @argenisleon

    Outstanding! Well written and distilled the essence of the game.

  • Anemos

    Amazing job.

    The thing is, however, that it is hard to consider what wasting your time is. Writing a long article after playing a couple non-stop hours of Zelda could be considered by some as "letting your life go by".

    Personally, I disagree with whoever says playing Zelda for hours on end is wrong. But, the main thing is that doing what you want with your life is a choice. Saying you are wasting your time is an opinion.

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  • ajsdvqeub

    really good article

  • BBQ Bram

    This a great personal interpretation, and most of those metaphors are fairly obvious, but calling this philosophy is very sophmoric. Have you ever read any philosopher?

    • Hylian Dan

      These are the definitions of philosophy I went by in choosing this title:

      "A set of ideas or beliefs relating to a particular field or activity; an underlying theory: an original philosophy of advertising."
      "A system of values by which one lives: has an unusual philosophy of life."

  • Pingback: Zelda.in » Blog Archive » The Philosophy of The Wind Waker – Part Three()

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  • Tshimangadzo ndou

    UNTO THE NEW LEGEND OF ZELDA

    You are my miracle.
    Thank you”

    I am so dawn “dawn for you.

  • cukeman

    Makes me think of WW haters – "If only… we had gotten a true sequel to OoT" they are not ready to leave the comfort zone of the first N64 Zelda game…

    • GorCoronSumo

      Nice…:-D
      Like it…

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/lifesavers2 lifesavers2

    Ah, Claps, Claps. Amazing article! I hope it will make people appreciate WW more. Claps.

  • DawsonTheMinish

    im stuck at the freaken wind temple the floor masters keep getting me!

    • GorCoronSumo

      Don't be foolishly reckless with the floor masters. :-D

  • SpiritZelda

    Tetra is familiar with hardship, but Link is inexperienced & reckless. I was on the floor LOLing so loud! That was funny! ^-^

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      okay…

  • http://loz-taoas.webs.com The Boy

    Kinda reminds me of Zelda in motion.

  • Sarianae

    Everyone else who's read this before me has already said this but let me reiterate…..

    This is a fantastic article. You made me look at the Wind Waker in ways that I have never thought about before. I am not sure how many of the things you pointed out are intentional on Nintendo's part (if they are then I'm very impressed and have a developed an even greater respect for them), but regardless of them being intentional or not, there are certainly many parallels that can be drawn between the game and real life, and many applicable metaphors that hold pretty valid as well.

    Excellent job! :)

  • gar

    amazing article. i feel so stupid when i don’t notice these kind of things in games. I think the only game i played trying to analyze its literature was mother 3

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  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Thareous Thareous

    Good job, ZU staff. You guys are awesome.

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  • MsTooManyVideoGames

    This is a great article! I can't wait to read more. It really goes into how the Legend of Zelda games aren't just exercise for your thumbs, but they are a life lesson as well. Before reading this, I just mindlessly slashed at Keese and beat a few bosses, without really thinking about what these games actually meant. Now I see that there are hidden meanings in the games, such as the being behind the veil of Dark Link. This was simply brilliant, and I can't wait to start looking deeper into the Legend of Zelda games I'm playing now.

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